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“Joaquin Murrieta” at Heritage Day

The story of one of California’s best-known bandits will be part of the 5th Annual Heritage Day on Oct. 20 at the Marsh Creek State Historic Park.

Film maker Todd Myers will be on hand to talk about his upcoming movie “Joaquin Murrieta, the Legend Untold” at the free annual event. Planned for release in 2019, the film will tell the story of the notorious outlaw whose stomping grounds included Rancho Los Meganos, the home of pioneer Dr. John Marsh and the site of the event. (Read more about Myers and the movie here: https://tinyurl.com/y7la7e4c).

Heritage Day will also include a talk by Marsh historians Bill and Kathleen Mero. There will also be kids activities, as well as a close-up look at, and into, Marsh’s iconic Stone House. You can also visit and learn about  the park’s ancient archaeology, antique farm equipment.

There will be two hikes at this year’s event, one providing panoramic views of the area and one around the  adjacent Marsh  Creek Reservoir led by Contra Costa Flood Control guides. (Hikes will step off at 9 a.m. A $10 donation is suggested for the hikes.)

Also, Spirited Sanctuary will present its popular petting zoo, and live music will be provided by the Brentwood Concert Band and the band Dawg Lips.

The event will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, or to volunteer at the event, email marsh1856@yahoo.com.

Murrieta

 

 

A new, old view of the Stone House

Barry Margesson, co-chair of the John Marsh Historic Trust, celebrates the newly cleared front yard of Marsh's Stone House. Trust volunteers this week helped State Parks move a 40-foot storage container that had blocked the view for more than a decade.

Barry Margesson, co-chair of the John Marsh Historic Trust, celebrates the newly cleared front yard of Marsh’s 162-year-old Stone House. Trust volunteers this week helped State Parks move a 40-foot storage container that had blocked the view for more than a decade.

A storage container that had stood in front of John Marsh’s iconic Stone House has been relocated to the rear of the building, once again providing a straight-on view of the house that’s been blocked for more than a decade.

The 40-foot container was put in place to keep floorboards, sections of stairs and other large architectural pieces that were removed from the house during stabilization work. It was relocated to the rear of the building by State Parks and volunteeers from the John Marsh Historic Trust as part of the Trust’s effort to build an Interpretive Center (IC) in front of the building.

The 40-foot container had blocked the view of the front of the Stone House since stabilization work on the house began in 2004.

The 40-foot container had blocked the view of the front of the Stone House since a major stabilization project on the house began in 2004.

Room for visitors

The move not only allows a better look at the 162-year-old building, but provides more room for hosting events in the Marsh Creek State Historic Park. Last year, the Trust began hosting fourth-grade educational field trips in the park, and in recent years has conducted public events such as hikes, artist access days, and an annual Heritage Day celebration in October.

“Our IC will allow us to open part of the park on a regular basis for the first time ever,” said Bob Jones, co-chair of the Trust board of directors. The IC will include picnic tables, a shade structure, parking, bathroom facilities and educational panels, and will be open for drop-in visits by the public at least one weekend a month to start.

Fundraising moves ahead

The IC was originally estimated to cost $75,000 to build. So far, the Trust has raised just over $12,500, and by teaming up with State Parks to relocate the container, about $5,000 more has been saved.

If you’d like to contribute to the effort, please use the PayPal link at the top of this page, or mail a check to JMHT, P.O. Box 1682, Brentwood, CA, 94513.