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Stone House Heritage Day coming Oct. 11, 2014

The John Marsh Historic Trust is excited to announce the first Stone House Heritage Day at Marsh Creek State Park, a free public event celebrating the history and natural resources of the newest and largest California State Historic Park.

“The JMHT is excited to host Heritage Day to welcome our supporters and friends for a chance to get inside the new park and up close to the house,” said Alexandra Ghiozzi, director of the JMHT board. “This is the first time since 2007 that we have been able to hold an event on the property, and this time around it’s free.”

Read the Brentwood Press story about the event here:  http://www.thepress.net/features/article_0e327132-346b-11e4-bff4-001a4bcf6878.html 

More details coming soon!

The 158-year-old Stone House on Aug. 24, the morning after the South Napa Earthquake left it unharmed. A free Heritage Day event will be held there on Oct. 14, 2014.

The 158-year-old Stone House on Aug. 24, the morning after the South Napa Earthquake left it unharmed. A free Heritage Day event will be held there on Oct. 11, 2014.

Slow progress at Stone House

Bracing and boards to close the opening of the north wall collapse were installed last week, seen here. This week, the repair was completed with additional wood on the exterior.

Bracing and boards to close the collapse at the top of the of the north wall, seen here, were installed last week. This week, the repair was completed with additional wood on the exterior.

Things are going slowly at the Stone House, but they’re going.

Workers with State Parks’ construction unit this week (through Aug. 22) finished bracing and enclosing the collapse on the north wall, and continued work on the foundation for the steel studs that will back up the existing sandstone walls.  Work has been sporadic, first delayed by a rattlesnake on the third floor, then by the complexity of working with the fragile, 158-year-old structure.

Fortunately, there have been no delays caused by archaeological finds. All dirt displaced by the trench for the foundation was removed from the building and sifted for artifacts before being returned to the building. The site was home to Native Americans for hundreds of years, off and on, but since the soil was disturbed when the house was originally built in 1856, no major finds are expected.

Meanwhile, the Trust is working with the California Cultural and Historical Endowment to get an extension of a $200,000 grant that’s helping to pay for the work. The original deadline to spend the money or lose it was March 1, but an extension until Sept. 1 was granted.

Unfortunately, only $25,000 of the funding has been spent to date, and with the new deadline looming the Trust has requested a second extension. The CCHE has been extremely understanding and cooperative, and it now appears a continuation until early 2015 will keep the funding in place at least that long. The slated completion of the project, originally estimated to be in October, will not be met. It’s unclear what the new date will be.

The Trust is continuing its fundraising efforts to ensure as much construction as possible can be done during the current project. An on-line fundraiser that has raised more than $1,100 is on-going, and can be reached at this link: bit.ly/1q85Mwb.